1. khaleersula:

    medievalpoc:

    prokopetz:

    cleopatrasweave:

    i drew a bunch of elves of color!!

    This post reminds me of something that happened a few years back.

    I once served as art director for a project where the illustration spec called for characters of a variety of races (in the real-world sense, not the Dungeons & Dragons sense - though the latter was involved as well).

    We had one particular artist, tasked with drawing a series of elves, who didn’t quite seem to get what that meant. Their output was basically “white elf”, “another white elf”, “white elf with a tan”, “white elf looking a bit pale”, “yet another white elf”, etc.

    When this was pointed out, they were like “oh, yeah, now I get it - I’ll totally fix that with my next piece”.

    They proceeded to turn in a picture of a blue elf.

    In the end, we had to provide specific quotas for specific levels of racial representation in order to get the point across. It all worked out in the end, but it’s stuck with me ever since that this artist examined the original spec, looked at our feedback, and came to the conclusion a blue elf was more plausible than a black one.

    In conclusion: this is awesome.

    Read that last paragraph as many times as you need to.

    paging peter jackson

    Reblogged from: khaleersula
  2. Call it the Curse of Knowledge: a difficulty in imagining what it is like for someone else not to know something that you know. The term was invented by economists to help explain why people are not as shrewd in bargaining as they could be when they possess information that their opposite number does not. Psychologists sometimes call it mindblindness. In the textbook experiment, a child comes into the lab, opens an M&M box and is surprised to find pencils in it. Not only does the child think that another child entering the lab will somehow know it contains pencils, but the child will say that he himself knew it contained pencils all along! The curse of knowledge is the single best explanation of why good people write bad prose. It simply doesn’t occur to the writer that her readers don’t know what she knows—that they haven’t mastered the argot of her guild, can’t divine the missing steps that seem too obvious to mention, have no way to visualize a scene that to her is as clear as day. And so the writer doesn’t bother to explain the jargon, or spell out the logic, or supply the necessary detail.
    Reblogged from: azspot
  3. Reblogged from: maureentheintern
  4. lettersandlight:

    image

    Whether you’re a planner or not, there’s one thing every writer will need as they prepare for NaNoWriMo: inspiration. We’ve challenged some of our favorite authors and the NaNo staff to inspire you by sharing what’s inspired them… and challenging you to prepare a specific jumpstart for that inevitable idea drought:

    The Inspirer: Marissa Meyer, author of the Lunar Chronicles series

    The Inspiration Sources:

    The Jumpstart: What do you love to read and write about? Write a 100-word Author Manifesto for the type of stories you’d like to be known for writing, whether that includes creating new universes, timeless human stories, or awesome girl superheroes.

    Why This Will Inspire You: It’s impossible for us creative-types to go through life without being influenced by the art and storytelling we come across every day, but we don’t always recognize our major influencers until we take a moment to reflect.

    Read More

    Reblogged from: lettersandlight
  5. cross-connect:

    Margarita Kareva is an artist photographer from Ekaterinburg (Russia). He specializes in fantasy art photography and creates beautiful pictures inspired by fantasy books and fairy tales

    I will make photographs for free of any interesting ideas or people in any country for the accommodation and flight tickets :)

    Check out her 500px account.

                                                :-)

    Reblogged from: crossconnectmag
  6. On the Internet especially, this deeply baffles some people. They say something dumb, everyone tells them that they’re dumb and to stop saying dumb things, and they interpret that as an assault on their right to free speech. It’s not, of course, because no one calling this dummy a dummy actually has the power to stop him from speaking. The best they can do is usually complain to whoever’s giving the dummy a platform, and asking them to take the platform away from him. But that’s, as discussed, a totally reasonable (and legal) thing the platform owner can do. In fact, this is more a case of free speech working perfectly, than it breaking down.

    The most hilarious thing about people holding up their right to free speech is how much it weakens everything else they’ve said. When the best thing someone can say about their argument is that it isn’t technically illegal, that doesn’t say much about the strength of their words, does it?
    Reblogged from: wordsforstrangers
  7. It’s an easy word to say. 

    Nobody. 

    Three short-enough syllabic sounds. Know. Buh. Dee.

    It rushes to mind when you feel helpless and flustered in ways other words can’t - the sum in somebody will be far too cumbersome, take far too long; let’s not even get me started on anybody.

    Read more
  8. kushandwizdom:

Words of Emotion
    Reblogged from: kushandwizdom
  9. theartofanimation:

    Kuldar Leement

    Reblogged from: theartofanimation
  10. Read more
  11. mikellis:

Pleased to announce that “Space Odyssey” has been “Chosen” to appear in American Illustration’s permanent archives. Thanks Judges!

    mikellis:

    Pleased to announce that “Space Odyssey” has been “Chosen” to appear in American Illustration’s permanent archives. Thanks Judges!

    Reblogged from: mikellis
  12. juliedillon:

This is an illustration I did for the August 2014 issue of Popular Science Magazine. The assignment was to show a scifi take on human aging in the future. I wanted to do something relatively positive, so I drew a lady whose life has been been prolonged through cybernetic enhancements and augmentation, so she gets to spend time with her great-great-great-great grandchildren. 
Thanks to AD Michelle Mruk!

    juliedillon:

    This is an illustration I did for the August 2014 issue of Popular Science Magazine. The assignment was to show a scifi take on human aging in the future. I wanted to do something relatively positive, so I drew a lady whose life has been been prolonged through cybernetic enhancements and augmentation, so she gets to spend time with her great-great-great-great grandchildren. 

    Thanks to AD Michelle Mruk!

    Reblogged from: juliedillon
  13. you call it 
    Jacob wrestling with the angel 

    i call it 
    a knife fight 
    in the alley behind God’s bedroom 
    begging for someone to just say aloud that 
    those who do good 
    deserve better 

    than this 
    knife fight to begin with.

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